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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting the place where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who could afford to escape the city heat and spend summers
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
. the hair on the back of my neck stood up, and i thought, there is no way that in america that this could happen. and i spoke out at that time, "you can't do that to us." and then he said, "yes, i can." i said, "that's not legal." and he came back with, "yes, it is." >> and it was. in the state of michigan, there is no law that prevents a boss from firing people virtually at will. at weyco, that meant no smoking at work, no smoking at home, no smoking period. >> good afternoon. weyco. >> weyco gave employees 15 months to quit, then they were subject to random nicotine testing. you fail, you're out. >> did either of you say, "okay, this is awful, but, you know, this is a chance to break the habit?" >> i did. i tried to quit smoking. i took advantage of their program, the smoking cessation program. but i was unsuccessful. >> i'm trying every way to cut down, quit--gum. i'm trying, yes, on my own, but i don't need an employer to do that. >> i pay the bills around here, so i'm gonna set the expectations. >> howard weyers is the boss, some would say tyrant, of weyco. >> what's important? this
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and asia and in poverty. johnson relucta
the coast of maine, remote and solitary, held special meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who co
destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is t
. stuart: a question for you. >> go ahead. stuart: in america we say you have goose bumps when you're very cold. in england we say you're hen-fleshed. are you either this morning? >> i am both, put together. times a hundred. stuart: excellent. >> i look like rudolph with my nose. stuart: may i recommend you wear a hat and i'm losing my hair and-- >> i do, i have a hat with me as well as ear warmers just not for this hit. can i tell you some things going on behind me today? >> no, don't have time, sorry. that's the way it is. >> i was going to tell you about the drunken revellers and their bathroom experiences, i guess you don't want to know. stuart: you should hear what they're saying, no more drunken revellers, no time. wrap up, keep warm, young lady, i mean it. >> thank you very much happy new year to you. stuart: happy new year to you, lauren. and on thursday, president obama signed an executive order that ends a pay freeze for congress and federal workers that is. as our march this coming here, federal employees will see 1/2% to 1% pay increase and get this, 535 members of congress wil
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
this morning." ñp that ended america's most infamous family feud. the hat fooelds and the mccoys. researchers have now found the first physical remains of the final battle. mark strassmann has the exclusive look of the evidence that could rewrite the history of these hillbilly clans. >> reporter: in these east kentucky hills bob scott's family has owned this land, almost 50 acres, since 1902. it was a stage for a bloody chapter in american history that's also part of his family history, the hatfield/mccoy feud. >> my mother's maiden name was hatfield. >> and this is mccoy property. >> randall mccoy, pate trat of the kentucky clan once lived here and his well sit here's on scott's land. his once enemy was hatfield, leader of the clan. this spot is where they finally ended a generation of fussin', fightin', and killing. sparked by a murder right after the civil war. >> mccoy's brother was a northern soldier. he comes back from the war. hatfield and his family fought for the south. word gout out they were out to get him and they eventually went out and get him. >> reporter: between 1865 and 1868
temperature-wise. in tokyo we're looking at 12 degrees. over towards the americas still things are very messy across much of the southwest. this is due to this winter storm system, and it is going to be a very heavy snowmaker. that will be moving into the four corners. welcoming rain will perhaps be in the phoenix region, but the mountainside will perhaps see about 30 centimeters of snowfall in nevada and new mexico. colorado, you may see more than that, and southern california you'll still see those rain but higher elevations will possibly pack up 5 centimeters of snowfall. across much of the southeast, things are looking very clear and the temperatures are rising here in chicago. that's well above your average. in fact, people in chicago actually broke the record for the longest stretch with no measurable snowfall. you haven't seen snow since rch 4 lt year, so 283 days of no snow. we're wondering when that snow will start there, but freezing rain has impacted paris. it was a slippery day for us out there. still a slippery thing. look at this video. freezing rain creates icy roads yesterday,
on hits to latin america. and adp to paris is lowering its growth target for 2015 as lower traffic .lower economic projections since the summer are now affecting its prospects, down 6%. so, again, whether it's a fiscal cliff or generally speaking with, the message this morning is fairly weak. take a look at the bond space note. moving into gilts, moving out of italy and spain, but as we've been saying, 4.5% or under that and about 5.3% for spain aren't bad considering. t thor row/dollar is weaker. most of the risk currencies are moving lower. euro/dollar down by .3%. sterling is weaker against the dollar. we're seeing the dollar generally up. the dollar/yen here up .4% for the yen. so we've seen some significant weakening as the bank of japan trying to combat deflation. but today, a pause in that move. joining us now with plenty more on the asian trade, diedra. >> it's not the end of the world, but it is pretty ugly out here in asia. markets were headed towards some gains today and then all of a sudden we did get that fiscal cliff set back. the nikkei 225 dropping a percent. you can see t
head on into the americas, it's going to be another wet day for you along the west coast from b.c. down through northern california. you've hood had a bit of a break. another round of rain coming in. and some very strong winds here, too. not much changed since last week. another low moving here through eastern canada. that will bring maybe 30 centimeters of snow to northern ontario as well as quebec. blowing and drifting snow here, too, so, again, difficult driving conditions. along the cold front, it's not going to be too severe. you'll see a few thunderstorms in that rain, but certainly temperatures will be falling as the front passes. that said, though, we're seeing some unseasonably warm temperatures across the east at the moment. chicago, 19 degrees. 24 in oklahoma city. 19 for you in d.c. with 16 in new york city. all right. let's go now to europe. a very messy picture here. the western locations are starting to see a low and frontal system moving through. that's going to be producing plenty of precipitation. and a lot of it is going to be snow here, as well. the same goes for the
sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940, which is essentially -- >> that's right. >> the segment of your book, final question. let people read ot
americas one of the most famous apt slavery advocate. famous as a radical ab list in nist. he was perceived to be that way because of a series of features he had given. lincoln on the other hand because he didn't have a national record could convincingly portray himself as the least radical the least antislavery republican. who is up for the race. so they go in and sue ward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. he also have -- weed is the name. fan fastic name. it's like tom wolf. perfectly portrays hawaii, you know, nature. he's the fine -- mid 19th merge has to offer he has essentially financial resources in the darings when table could involve cash as well as anything else you imagine. that doesn't happen. of course not. enormous advantages. he's been to many conventions. he dominated most. he goes there in fact sue ward was not the republican nominee in 1856 they told him there was no way we were winning. you don't want to be the leader of losing cost. let's wait four years and we'll win. he read the politics r
predict america will go back into a recession. >> here's what will happen starting tomorrow. income taxes would increase $2,400 a year for families with an annual income of $50,000 to $75,000. their social security taxes would also go up on average $1,000 a year. and some 2 million jobless americans stand to lose their fed caleral unemployment benefits. in all, the congressional budget office says going over the cliff could cost the country more than 3 million jobs in 2013. we begin our coverage with nancy cordes on capitol hill. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the senate is set to reconvene in about an hour. we're told negotiations progressed well last night, that the vice president is now heavily involved and that the two sides have moved significantly towards one another on the top issue, which is tax cuts. but the big question is whether they can make it the rest of the way before tonight's deadline. senators filled the halls sunday hoping they'd have a deal to vote on, but just before 6:00, the senate leader sent them home. >> there's still significan
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)